Forestry

 
forestry
 
Station Leaders:  Lynn Kochiss
 
email:   forestryctenvirothon@gmail.com
 
 

FORESTRY STATION

With close to 60% of its land area in forest, Connecticut is one of the most heavily forested states in the nation. At the same time, Connecticut is also one of the most densely populated states.  

Connecticut’s forests and trees add immensely to the quality of life for the people of the state.  They filter the air that is breathed, safeguard private and public drinking water sources, produce locally grown forest products, provide essential habitat for wildlife, and offer many recreational opportunities. Whether people in Connecticut live in an urban, suburban, or rural setting, they are connected to the forest.  Forests and trees are integral to the character of Connecticut. 

Forests are dynamic ecosystems, with numerous factors influencing their development. To understand the forest we must know about the history of the forest; what forces have shaped it; and the interactions between man, forest and nature.  

The FORESTRY STATION LEARNING GUIDE below covers a wide variety of forestry topics. Students will develop a working knowledge of forest ecosystems and their management, and also an appreciation of the value of our forest resources. Students should focus on the following Learning Objectives.

National Envirothon Key Points for Forestry are supported by the following CT Envirothon objectives. For more detailed information on the National Key Points, click here.

FORESTRY STATION LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  1. CONNECTICUT FOREST HISTORY Understand and describe the basic natural history of Connecticut’s forests.
  2. TREE PHYSIOLOGY Identify “what makes a tree a tree” and tree growth characteristics adapted to soil types, water availability, and the needs of a tree.
  3. FOREST ECOLOGY Understand and describe forest ecology principles, including:
  • The relationship between soil and forest types
  • Forest regeneration, competition, succession
  • The relationship between factors such as climate, insects, diseases, wildlife, and invasive species on forest growth and development
  • The function and value of forested watersheds and riparian areas
  1. SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT Understand and describe basic forest management practices for managing forests, including the difference between various silvicultural systems and treatments.
  2. TREE AND SHRUB IDENTIFICATION Identify the common tree and shrub species in Connecticut.
  3. TREE MEASUREMENT – Use a clinometer, a DBH tape, and a Biltmore (tree scale) stick for measuring tree diameter and merchantable height, and estimating board-foot volume.
  4. TREES AS AN IMPORTANT RENEWABLE RESOURCE– Understand the importance of trees in urban and community settings and the economic value of forests.

FORESTRY LEARNING GUIDE-STUDY MATERIALS:

1. CONNECTICUT FOREST HISTORY

2.TREE PHYSIOLOGY

3. FOREST ECOLOGY

FACTORS AFFECTING FOREST HEALTH

4. SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT

Forest Management on Connecticut Lands

DEEP Photos—Before and After Treatments

5. TREE AND SHRUB IDENTIFICATION

Use A Dichotomous Key

Tree ID Guides

6. TREE MEASUREMENT

7. TREES AS AN IMPORTANT RENEWABLE RESOURCE

Benefits Forest Provide:

Foresters; Forestry Equipment, Landowner Resources:

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